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Article
December 11, 1943

EFFECT OF CERTAIN SULFONAMIDES ON THE ELECTRICAL ACTIVITY OF THE CEREBRAL CORTEX

Author Affiliations

BOSTON

From the Department of Neurology, Harvard Medical School, and the Neurological Unit, Boston City Hospital.

JAMA. 1943;123(15):948-950. doi:10.1001/jama.1943.02840500012004
Abstract

The local application of sulfonamides to cranial injuries has become a widespread practice, particularly in military surgery. Recently reports by Watt and Alexander1 in England and Pilcher and his co-workers2 in this country have indicated that sulfathiazole in particular should not be allowed to come in contact with the cerebral cortex because of the danger of generalized convulsions. Sulfadiazine and sulfapyridine did not appear to possess this disadvantage. Because of the considerable practical importance of the problem at present, we have undertaken a series of experiments designed to determine the effect of local applications of various sulfonamides on the electrical activity of the cortex.

METHOD  The experiments were all acute ones and were done on cats under light or moderate anesthesia induced with pentobarbital sodium. The electrical activity of the exposed cortex was recorded by a Grass ink-writing electroencephalograph such as is used for clinical electroencephalography. Unipolar electrodes

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