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Article
December 11, 1943

STAPHYLOCOCCUS AUREUS SEPTICEMIA TREATED WITH PENICILLIN: WITH REPORT OF DRUG SIDE EFFECTS

Author Affiliations

Physician and Resident Physician, Respectively, City Hospital New York

From the First Medical Service, City Hospital.

JAMA. 1943;123(15):956-958. doi:10.1001/jama.1943.82840500001007
Abstract

The following report describes a case of Staphylococcus aureus septicemia successfully treated with penicillin, including the presentation of some side reactions resulting from the use of this material intravenously:

REPORT OF CASE 

History.—  P. K., a white man aged 36, hoist engineer and former sailor by occupation, was admitted to the First Medical Service of City Hospital, Welfare Island, N. Y., on Dec. 29, 1942 with chief complaints of chest pains, fever and malaise of forty-eight hours' duration. He had apparently enjoyed good health prior to the onset of the present illness and gave no history of recent contact with a sick person, bone injury or superficial wounds. For two days prior to admission he complained of repeated chilly sensations without frank chills, fever, malaise, vague bilateral chest pains, mild cough productive of small amounts of whitish sputum, headache, weakness, anorexia and constipation, for which he treated himself at

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