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Article
December 18, 1943

TREATMENT OF PITYRIASIS ROSEA BY THE INJECTION OF TYPHOID VACCINE

Author Affiliations

Chicago

From the Bernard Fantus Outpatient Department, Cook County Hospital.

JAMA. 1943;123(16):1036-1037. doi:10.1001/jama.1943.82840510002007a
Abstract

Pityriasis rosea is a fairly common acute self-limiting cutaneous eruption which causes no systemic symptoms. Intrinsically it is not of great importance, although it may cause uncomfortable itching in perhaps one third of the cases. However, it causes considerable worry to the patient. Its extensive distribution and unsightly appearance suggest serious possibilities. Untreated it usually heals spontaneously in four to ten weeks, leaving no sequelae. It rarely recurs.

The symmetrically disposed lesions are round or oval pinkish maculopapules which vary greatly in size and are slightly scaly. They are ordinarily easy to recognize, especially if the long axes of the ovals lie along the lines of cleavage of the body. Frequently a "herald spot" antedates the eruption by a week or ten days. The mode of spread of the eruption is as characteristic as the lesions in most cases. As Darier has said, it is "successive, progressive and descendent." Ordinarily

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