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Article
September 12, 1931

THE TREATMENT OF HEMATEMESIS BY THE RETENTION CATHETER

JAMA. 1931;97(11):771-775. doi:10.1001/jama.1931.02730110021006
Abstract

The literature on hematemesis is interesting, but it is not my province to cover it in this brief article on treatment. Surgery has a smaller number of advocates as time goes on. Balfour,1 Bevan2 and Lahey3 all advise against immediate operation but reserve intervention later for recurrent bleeding. A discussion may be found in the articles of Kaufmann,4 Bastedo5 and Andresen,6 and in the 1923-1924 session of the British Royal Society of Medicine.

Ewald,7 Kaufmann and Hurst8 were early champions of initial gastric lavage. Its advantages are thus described by Kaufmann:

These stagnating masses are usually very sour and fermenting, and their presence not only causes nausea and pain but acts very harmfully by constantly irritating the mucous membrane to intense hypersecretion, thereby further increasing the amount of gastric contents. The removal of the fermenting masses not only relieves annoying symptoms of

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