[Skip to Content]
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
December 25, 1943

TOLUENE POISONING

Author Affiliations

MEDICAL CORPS, ARMY OF THE UNITED STATES

JAMA. 1943;123(17):1106-1108. doi:10.1001/jama.1943.02840520022006

This article is only available in the PDF format. Download the PDF to view the article, as well as its associated figures and tables.

Abstract

Toluene is a hydrocarbon, C6H5CH3, also known as toluol and methyl benzene. It is a colorless, highly refractive inflammable liquid obtained from tolu and other resins and from coal tar. It boils at 110.4 C. and has an odor similar to that of benzene. It is insoluble in water and is miscible with alcohol, ether, chloroform, carbon disulfide and petroleum benzine. Its specific gravity is about 0.865 at 250 C. It dissolves iodine, phosphorus, sulfur and, when used in large amounts, resins and fats.

Toluene constitutes 2 to 10 per cent of commercial benzene. It is used extensively as a solvent in the rubber, lacquer and munitions industries. It affords an excellent solvent for certain types of synthetic rubber because it dries rapidly. It is used as a starting material in the manufacture of trinitrotoluene.

The pathologic manifestations of exposure to toluene (toluol) are a

First Page Preview View Large
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview
×