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Editorial
October 17, 2017

End-of-Life Care Among Immigrants: Disparities or Differences in Preferences?

Author Affiliations
  • 1Palliative and Advanced Illness Research Center, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia
  • 2Department of Biostatistics, Epidemiology, and Informatics, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia
  • 3Center for Health Equity Research and Promotion, Philadelphia VA Medical Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
  • 4Leonard Davis Institute of Health Economics, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia
  • 5Division of Pulmonary, Allergy, and Critical Care Medicine, Department of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia
  • 6Department of Medical Ethics and Health Policy, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia
JAMA. 2017;318(15):1448-1449. doi:10.1001/jama.2017.13698

Although describing a “good death” is an existentially challenging exercise, most people, if asked to do so, would note the importance of the presence of friends and family, relief from distressing symptoms, time at home, completing life goals, and other values. Although these goals are likely shared quite widely, how they are prioritized, and how they relate to other goals, may vary among individuals and across cultures.1

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