[Skip to Content]
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
January 8, 1944

PRODUCTION OF BLOOD DERIVATIVES TO MEET WAR REQUIREMENTS IN GREAT BRITAINWITH A NOTE ON THE LARGE SCALE PREPARATION OF A DRIED PRODUCT

JAMA. 1944;124(2):76-79. doi:10.1001/jama.1944.02850020006002
Abstract

In a country at war the choice of a blood substitute and its preparation must be considerably influenced by the special circumstances of the moment. The present review describes briefly the various phases through which this subject has passed during the last four years and the position reached at the present time.

With the return of peace it may well be that many different blood substitutes will be brought forward, but the assessment of their relative merits will entail much clinical trial and experience.

Stored whole blood has but a limited life and therefore cannot be made universally available; moreover, there are certain conditions such as burns in which the circulatory volume is reduced without a corresponding reduction in the number of red cells and in which a transfusion containing red cells may not be beneficial. Certainly in war and probably also in peace there is a definite need for

First Page Preview View Large
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview
×