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JAMA Diagnostic Test Interpretation
November 7, 2017

Interpretation of Urine Drug Screens: Metabolites and Impurities

Author Affiliations
  • 1Department of Anesthesiology, Northwestern University, Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, Illinois
  • 2Department of Medicine and Medical Education, Northwestern University, Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, Illinois
  • 3Department of Pathology, Northwestern University, Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, Illinois
JAMA. 2017;318(17):1704-1705. doi:10.1001/jama.2017.10910

A 50-year-old woman with chronic pain and recurrent infections from common variable immunodeficiency presented to a new primary care physician for management of her pain medications. Her pain was related to multiple vertebral fractures due to chronic steroid use for an inflammatory polyarthritis that was not responsive to hydroxychloriquine and methotrexate. Her pain medication regimen (methadone, 20 mg [3×/d]; immediate-release morphine, 30 mg [5×/d]; gabapentin, 1200 mg [2×/d]; duloxetine, 60 mg/d; and celecoxib, 200 mg [2×/d]) helped her independently complete instrumental activities of daily living. She reported no adverse effects (eg, somnolence or constipation). A comprehensive urine drug screen using immunoassay and mass spectrometry was ordered (Table 1).

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