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Article
May 13, 1944

THE NATURAL COURSE OF POLIOMYELITISA REPORT OF 70 CASES

JAMA. 1944;125(2):99-102. doi:10.1001/jama.1944.02850200007003
Abstract

Following the first 10 cases of poliomyelitis in Louisiana1 in 1841 there were a few small outbreaks scattered throughout the United States. Except for Caverly's report of 132 cases which occurred in Vermont in 1894,2 these cases were neither sufficiently numerous nor well enough studied to assume much importance, and it was not until the first major epidemic in 19071 that the disease began to attract much attention in this country. This epidemic followed by two years the big Scandinavian outbreak and was thought to have been stimulated by increased immigration to this country.1

Since 1907 poliomyelitis has been constantly in evidence, and every year sees its epidemic. Reports have been numerous and, though few of them are detailed enough to be statistically valid, together they bring out a few obvious basic facts. Since consideration of these seems lately to have been abandoned in favor of

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