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Article
July 20, 1929

POLYARTHRITIS: FURTHER STUDIES ON THE EFFECTS OF SYMPATHETIC GANGLIONECTOMY AND RAMISECTOMY

Author Affiliations

ROCHESTER, MINN.

From the Division of Medicine and the Section on Neurologic Surgery, the Mayo Clinic.

JAMA. 1929;93(3):179-182. doi:10.1001/jama.1929.02710030015008
Abstract

In March, 1927, we reported the early results of lumbar sympathetic ganglionectomy and ramisectomy in a case of polyarthritis of the lower extremities in a young woman, a stenographer by occupation. The case was one of apparently hopeless arthritis deformans involving all the joints of the upper and lower extremities; the condition had persisted for six years and had resisted all forms of medical management. The extremities were cold and clammy, were bathed in sweat, were mottled and cyanotic in appearance, and exhibited marked swelling about the joints. Changes ordinarily considered trophic were very marked: atrophy of the muscles, thin, shiny skin, and ridged, thin, brittle and pitted nails. Bilateral lumbar ganglionectomy was performed by one of us (Adson) in June, 1926. There was immediate and complete disappearance of all signs and symptoms of arthritis in the lower extremities.

The patient was sent home, but returned in October, 1928, at

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