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Article
June 17, 1944

INHALATION THERAPY AT THE RHODE ISLAND HOSPITALA TEN YEAR PROGRESS NOTE

JAMA. 1944;125(7):469-472. doi:10.1001/jama.1944.02850250009004
Abstract

The deleterious effects of hypoxia are too well known to physiologists, clinicians and flight surgeons to require emphasis, and the efficacy of the inhalation of air rich in oxygen to overcome hypoxia and prevent or correct its harmful action is equally well known. The use of oxygen therapy in the treatment of conditions in which hypoxia may be an important factor has become routine in clinical practice. A great deal has been written on the subject, and a number of efficient methods for the administration of gases have been developed and generally adopted. Two facts, however, in connection with the use of these methods are so important that they deserve to be emphasized repeatedly. They are that: (1) the application of an adequate method to the patient in need of oxygen is no proof that he is receiving oxygen sufficient for his needs and (2) the correct application of an

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