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Article
August 17, 1929

THE FUNCTION OF THE PRACTITIONER IN THE MODERN MEDICAL SCHOOL

JAMA. 1929;93(7):503-505. doi:10.1001/jama.1929.02710070001001
Abstract

During the past thirty years a remarkable transformation has taken place in the character and pedagogic methods of American medical schools. A generation ago our medical colleges were poorly equipped and practically without endowment. At that time clinical teaching was carried on exclusively by practitioners, and in many institutions even the fundamental medical sciences were taught largely by physicians who were giving part of their time to practice.

Today the situation is entirely changed. Many of our leading schools of medicine have endowments that rival in size the entire financial assets of smaller universities. With this increase in wealth it has been possible for the medical schools to have the fundamental sciences taught entirely by professional teachers. In more recent years this movement toward full-time teaching has been extended to the clinical branches, and now a number of the leading schools have placed the departments of medicine, surgery and pediatrics

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