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Article
August 17, 1929

BLOOD CHANGES IN VICTIMS OF THE CLEVELAND CLINIC FILM DISASTER

Author Affiliations

CLEVELAND

From the Departments of Biochemistry, Physiology and Pharmacology, Western Reserve University School of Medicine, Cleveland.

JAMA. 1929;93(7):512-513. doi:10.1001/jama.1929.02710070010003
Abstract

In view of the editorial comment1 on the hazard of toxic gases formed in the combustion of roentgen films, the blood changes observed in several victims of the Cleveland Clinic disaster who were alive on the second day may be of interest.

The patients gassed in the Cleveland Clinic disaster can be divided into two groups: those who died almost immediately, and those in whom the symptoms were delayed for several hours. No specimens of blood were obtained by us from the former, who succumbed probably to the additive effects of carbon monoxide, nitric fumes and possibly cyanide gases. The events in the second group, the patients with delayed effects, correspond in the main closely to those described by Wood2 in 1912, who reported observations on nine patients and a number of experimental animals poisoned by the inhalation of nitric fumes. This group of clinic patients became practically

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