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July 29, 1944

THE PLACE OF HEALTH RESORTS IN REHABILITATION FOLLOWING INJURIES

JAMA. 1944;125(13):905-911. doi:10.1001/jama.1944.72850310003008
Abstract

It is undoubtedly a fact that we are now facing the most stupendous problem in rehabilitation which has ever existed in the history of the world.1

The number of war injuries sustained in the army and navy and also in industrial and other civilian pursuits will be the largest our country has ever known. Adequate utilization of our national health resorts will assist materially in solving our rehabilitation problems. But rehabilitation of those disabled by the war must follow a broad general plan in which use of our health resorts can play only a limited, although extremely important, part.

Fortunately, considerable thought is already being given to postwar rehabilitation. President Roosevelt2 in a radio address on July 28, 1943 said: "We must this time have plans ready—instead of waiting to do a hasty, inefficient and ill considered job at the last moment." He outlined a six point program,

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