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Article
September 7, 1929

SLUDER'S NASAL GANGLION SYNDROME AND ITS RELATION TO INTERNAL MEDICINE

Author Affiliations

PASADENA, CALIF.

JAMA. 1929;93(10):750-753. doi:10.1001/jama.1929.02710100012006
Abstract

In 1908, the late Greenfield Sluder reported certain neuralgic symptoms that he thought were produced by lesions affecting the nasal ganglions (sphenopalatine, Meckel's). Later (1909, 1910, 1915), he reported motor, sensory, gustatory, ocular, respiratory and sympathetic phenomena (vasomotor and secretory). He stated that the symptoms were but little relieved by the usual analgesics but could be greatly relieved by cocaine anesthesia in the region of the ganglions. In 1918 Dr. Sluder presented these views in a monograph, "Concerning Some Eye Disorders of Nasal Origin," and in 1927 he gave a more matured account of the subject in his book on "Nasal Neurology, Headaches and Eye Disorders,"1 the part dealing with the nasal ganglions and their clinical relations filling fifty pages.

W. E. Casselberry referred to the subject in 1911, and Mink of Utrecht in 1915, but it was not until 1921 that reports by R. A. Barlow2 of

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