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Article
September 21, 1929

CICATRICIAL STRICTURE OF THE STOMACH WITHOUT INVOLVEMENT OF THE ESOPHAGUS FOLLOWING THE INGESTION OF FORMALDEHYDE

Author Affiliations

Rochester, Minn.

From the Division of Medicine and the Division of Surgery, the Mayo Clinic.

JAMA. 1929;93(12):917-918. doi:10.1001/jama.1929.27110120001008
Abstract

Cicatricial stricture of the esophagus frequently follows the swallowing of caustics but unless the substance is taken in large amounts, as in attempts at suicide, the stomach is rarely burned sufficiently to produce extensive scarring with the formation of a gastric stricture.

In a case previously reported,1 the esophagus and stomach were burned severely by the ingestion of a solution of lye, and pyloric stenosis followed. The solution was taken with suicidal intent.

The case reported here is unusual in that extensive scarring of the stomach without involvement of the esophagus followed the ingestion of a solution of formaldehyde.

REPORT OF CASE  A man, aged 59, examined Dec. 11, 1928, had accidentally swallowed a solution of formaldehyde in October. The strength of the solution was not known. Immediately following the accident he had had epigastric pain for two or three hours. Milk, water and mustard were administered. He vomited

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