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Article
October 5, 1929

A FATAL CASE OF BRAIN ABSCESS FROM VINCENT'S ANGINA FOLLOWING EXTRACTION OF A TOOTH UNDER PROCAINE HYDROCHLORIDE

Author Affiliations

Pueblo, Colo.

From the Pueblo Medical Group.

JAMA. 1929;93(14):1063-1065. doi:10.1001/jama.1929.27110140002009a
Abstract

A recent death following tooth extraction under local anesthesia, with isolation of the Vincent's organism from an abscess in the right temporal lobe of the brain, prompted a search of the literature for all information available regarding this disease. While Vincent's organisms have been found in connection with one case of acute leukemia, one case of pemphigus, hospital gangrene, pelvic peritonitis, industrial wounds, gunshot wounds, tooth wounds and two cases of brain abscess, its exact etiologic importance in all these conditions is not entirely clear. Little is known of the organisms. Some writers1 assert that the fusiform bacillus and the spirillum are different morphologic forms of the same organism; others believe they are not; and at least one student2 of the disease believes that a short chain streptococcus is produced somewhere in the life span. It is certain, however, that Vincent's angina, or trench mouth, is prevalent, almost

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