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November 20, 2018

Health Apps and Health Policy: What Is Needed?

Author Affiliations
  • 1Division of General Internal Medicine and Primary Care, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts
  • 2Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts
  • 3Department of Health Policy and Management, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts
  • 4Department of Emergency Medicine, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts
JAMA. 2018;320(19):1975-1976. doi:10.1001/jama.2018.14378

Health care in the United States is the most expensive in the world, yet health care quality is highly variable.1 Health apps have the potential to improve efficiency and value while lowering costs. More than 325 000 health apps have been developed, with increasing investment during the past decade. If health apps are to be successful and broadly adopted, patients and clinicians must have confidence that they are safe and effective.

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