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Research Letter
December 4, 2018

Association Between the Liaison Committee on Medical Education’s Diversity Standards and Changes in Percentage of Medical Student Sex, Race, and Ethnicity

Author Affiliations
  • 1Department of Emergency Medicine, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut
  • 2Department of Emergency Medicine, Alpert Medical School of Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island
  • 3National Clinician Scholars Program, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut
  • 4Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut
  • 5Chronic Disease Epidemiology, Yale School of Public Health, New Haven, Connecticut
  • 6Section of General Internal Medicine, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut
JAMA. 2018;320(21):2267-2269. doi:10.1001/jama.2018.13705

To improve diversity in undergraduate medical education, in 2009, the Liaison Committee on Medical Education (LCME) introduced 2 diversity accreditation standards mandating US allopathic medical schools to engage in systematic efforts to attract and retain students from diverse backgrounds and develop programs, such as pipeline and academic enrichment programs, to broaden diversity among qualified applicants.1 These standards characterized diversity broadly, including but not limited to sex, race/ethnicity, and socioeconomic status. Because individual medical schools undergo accreditation review at least every 8 years, the LCME would have evaluated all schools for adherence by 2017. This observational study examined the change in US medical school matriculant sex, race, and ethnicity after the implementation of the LCME diversity accreditation standards.

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