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Article
November 16, 1929

THE ADMINISTRATION OF OXYGEN BY THE NASAL CATHETER

Author Affiliations

NEW YORK
From the Department of Medicine, Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, and the Presbyterian Hospital.

JAMA. 1929;93(20):1550-1551. doi:10.1001/jama.1929.02710200034009
Abstract

The administration of oxygen by a catheter inserted in the nose was used in the late war for the treatment of pulmonary edema due to gas poisoning. Introduced by Stokes,1 it was employed with variable results by Douglas,1 Ryle,1 Hamil,1 and Hoover.2 In general, the nasal catheter was considered less effective but more comfortable than the Haldane mask. In 1922 I3 found it to be an effective method of administering oxygen to infants, in whom the oxygen consumption and tidal air were small. Subsequent experience demonstrated that the oxygen concentration of the inspired air could be increased to 30 per cent and the oxygen content of the arterial blood of patients with pneumonia could be considerably elevated if 2 liters a minute of oxygen was delivered through the catheter.4

Since that time I have studied the effect of 5 liters a minute of

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