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January 6, 1945

CAUSALGIA: A PRELIMINARY REPORT OF NINE CASES SUCCESSFULLY TREATED BY SURGICAL AND CHEMICAL INTERRUPTION OF THE SYMPATHETIC PATHWAYS

JAMA. 1945;127(1):9-15. doi:10.1001/jama.1945.02860010011003
Abstract

Burning pain, hyperesthesia and trophic disturbances with their various side effects, resulting from injury to a peripheral nerve, were first grouped as a symptom complex in 1813 by Alexander Denmark, surgeon to Haslar Hospital. He described a typical picture of median nerve causalgia with ulceration of the palm of the hand. Percival Potts before this had referred in his lectures to the intractable pain occasionally resulting from the partial division of a peripheral nerve.1 Paget in 1864 gave an accurate description of the trophic and secretory phenomena associated with causalgia. saying, in his description of the changes in the hands and fingers, "the fingers are usually tapering, smooth, hairless, almost void of wrinkles, glossy, pink, ruddy, or blotched as if with permanent chilblains."2 In the same year the term causalgia itself was coined by Mitchell. Morehouse and Keen3 in an article in which are described their experiences

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