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January 20, 1945

TRANSMISSION OF PRIMARY ATYPICAL PNEUMONIA TO HUMAN VOLUNTEERSCOMMISSION ON ACUTE RESPIRATORY DISEASES

JAMA. 1945;127(3):146-149. doi:10.1001/jama.1945.02860030018005
Abstract

Etiologic studies of primary atypical pneumonia have been described in several recent publications.1 It has been shown that bacteria,2 rickettsias,3 fungi4 and viruses, particularly those of the psittacosis group,5 may produce the syndrome of atypical pneumonia: No etiologic relationship to these known agents, however, has been demonstrated in the majority of cases, and the assumption has been made that an unknown virus is the causative factor.

Various pneumotropic agents have been isolated in animals,6 but confirmation of the relationship of these agents to the human disease has been lacking. During the past three years, extensive animal experimentation has been undertaken by the Commission on Acute Respiratory Diseases.7 Sputums, throat washings and blood obtained from patients, and pathologic material from fatal cases, have been utilized. Various routes and methods of inoculation have been employed. No bacteria or viruses bearing a direct etiologic relationship to

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