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February 17, 1945

THE TREATMENT OF PREMENSTRUAL DISTRESS, WITH SPECIAL CONSIDERATION OF THE ANDROGENS

JAMA. 1945;127(7):377-379. doi:10.1001/jama.1945.02860070009003
Abstract

Relatively little attention has been paid by most physicians to the distress that many women undergo during the premenstrual period which usually disappears with the onset of menses. The disturbance at this time of the ovarian cycle has been termed premenstrual tension. The symptoms arising here are varied in character and in intensity and occur in various combinations, the most common complaints being nervousness, irritability, depression, emotional instability, headache, nausea and a feeling of tenseness. The most common signs are bloating of the abdomen and subcutaneous edema. In addition, patients may complain of a feeling of tightness of the skin, pruritus and swelling of the vulva and gastrointestinal disturbances such as vomiting, diarrhea or cramps. Occasionally one encounters bizarre manifestations such as premenstrual coma, convulsions, nymphomania and arthritic and neuritic pains. There is often observed, however, an aggravation of conditions which have little relation to ovarian function, such as asthma

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