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March 17, 1945

BILATERAL TEMPORAL ARTERITIS WITH COMPLETE LOSS OF VISION

JAMA. 1945;127(11):647-649. doi:10.1001/jama.1945.92860110003007b
Abstract

Since the original paper of Horton, Magath and Brown1 many cases of temporal arteritis have been reported, and this syndrome is now recognized as a definite clinical entity.

Temporal arteritis is a self-limited, nonfatal disease characterized by headaches more or less constant and frequently worse at night, general malaise, lassitude, weakness, night sweats and low grade fever, and frequently there is pain in the jaws which makes chewing difficult. The temperature ranges from 98 to 103 F., and the blood may show a mild leukocytosis and an anemia. Mental symptoms are not common, but in a case reported by Sprague2 there was definite dulling of the intellect. Most of these patients have rather severe constitutional symptoms and appear much sicker than the objective signs would indicate. In the typical case, a few weeks after the onset of the headache, the temporal arteries become tortuous, enlarged and

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