[Skip to Content]
Access to paid content on this site is currently suspended due to excessive activity being detected from your IP address 34.203.245.76. Please contact the publisher to request reinstatement.
[Skip to Content Landing]
Other Articles
April 21, 1945

AN IMPROVED TECHNIC FOR THE COLLECTION OF CEREBROSPINAL FLUID AFTER LUMBAR PUNCTURE

JAMA. 1945;127(16):1051. doi:10.1001/jama.1945.92860160002007a
Abstract

The Dattner lumbar puncture needle1 as modified by L. W. Harrison,2 has been in use since 1937 primarily because of the low incidence of headaches associated with lumbar puncture. H. W. Allen,3 who first reported on the use of this needle in England, stated that in 116 punctures in which the inner needle (25 British standard wire gage) penetrated the meninges only two headaches of incapacitating severity and sixteen mild headaches occurred. On the other hand, in 11 punctures in which the membranes had been punctured by the outer needle (20 British standard wire gage) severe headaches occurred in 5 cases.

The small caliber of the inner needle (25 British standard wire gage) requires that an average of one half hour elapse in order to collect 6 cc. of cerebrospinal fluid for laboratory examination. The search for a satisfactory method of holding a glass tube for collecting

×