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May 12, 1945

CUTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF THE FUNGI CAUSING DERMATOPHYTOSIS AND ONYCHOMYCOSIS: AND THEIR TREATMENT

JAMA. 1945;128(2):77-83. doi:10.1001/jama.1945.02860190013004
Abstract

With the demobilization of men and women following World War II, one can expect an increase in the incidence of dermatophytosis, or "athlete's foot," as this common ringworm infection of the feet is popularly known. Between 1940 and 1943 the Navy hospitalized 14,068 patients for fungous infections of the skin,1 the large majority of them involving the groin and the feet. These patients lost 251,418 days from active service, representing 17.1 per cent of sick days lost for all skin diseases. The incidence of infection not requiring hospitalization is much higher. Since, even in normal times, from 50 to 90 per cent of the young adult population are affected at some period, it is important for the physician in general practice to be able to recognize the cutaneous manifestations of this common fungous infection. Early recognition of the causative fungus and proper therapy will aid materially in shortening the

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