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June 2, 1945

THE PROBLEM OF NONFLUORESCENT RINGWORM OF THE SCALPA WARNING

JAMA. 1945;128(5):350-352. doi:10.1001/jama.1945.02860220032008
Abstract

The presence of an epidemic of ringworm of the scalp in New York has been known for several years. During this period new cases have appeared sporadically throughout the United States and have produced minor epidemics in various cities. In a previous publication we1 discussed the routine diagnosis and treatment of epidemic tinea capitis. In the majority of instances the infection is due to either "animal" (Microsporum lanosum) or "human" (Microsporum audouini) types of fungi. While these agents are responsible for different clinical and laboratory findings, they have one important property in common. This peculiarity is disclosed by examination of the infected hairs by means of Wood's light or filter. This light' or filter is composed of glass containing sodium barium silicate and nickel oxide. When placed over a source of ultraviolet radiation it screens out all wavelengths except those in the near portion of the ultraviolet part of

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