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July 7, 1945

EFFECTIVENESS OF PENICILLIN IN THE TREATMENT OF VINCENT'S ANGINA

JAMA. 1945;128(10):704-706. doi:10.1001/jama.1945.02860270006002
Abstract

The effectiveness of penicillin as an antispirochetal agent in the treatment of syphilis,1 relapsing fever,2 Weil's disease3 and rat bite fever4 has prompted a study of its use in Vincent's infections.

For this study, only patients with Vincent's angina have been selected because Vincent's infection of the tonsil, although subject to recurrence, is an acute illness and is almost always a primary infection. Where it is not, the underlying cause, such as a blood dyscrasia, is evident. On the other hand, Vincent's gingivitis is much more apt to be a chronic or frequently recurrent illness, often associated with dental abnormalities or faulty nutrition, and its treatment entails proper dental or vitamin therapy as well as antispirochetal measures. True evaluation of chemotherapy for Vincent's gingivitis, therefore, is difficult and a long follow-up period is necessary.

Fourteen cases of Vincent's angina have been treated with penicillin at this

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