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Editorial
September 17, 2019

Evidence-Based Treatment for Mixed Urinary Incontinence

Author Affiliations
  • 1Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Utah School of Medicine, Salt Lake City
JAMA. 2019;322(11):1049-1051. doi:10.1001/jama.2019.12659

One in 6 women in the United States reports symptoms of moderate to severe urinary incontinence.1 The primary types are stress urinary incontinence, in which involuntary loss of urine occurs with effort or physical exertion, and urgency urinary incontinence, in which leakage is associated with a sensation of urgency.2 Of women with urinary incontinence, approximately one-third have mixed incontinence, that is, symptoms of both stress and urgency incontinence.3

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