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July 28, 1945

CALLUSES, CICATRICES AND OTHER STIGMAS AS AN AID TO PERSONAL IDENTIFICATION

JAMA. 1945;128(13):925-932. doi:10.1001/jama.1945.02860300015004
Abstract

From Ramazzini to the modern outstanding works of Oppenheim,1 Natori,2 Prosser White3 and Schwartz and Tulipan4 much has been written on the subject of professional stigmas.

Many investigators have been interested particularly in a rapid detection of a person's occupation or business by a glance at his palms, by his general appearance, by the odor emanating from his body or clothes, and so on. For instance Tardieu,5 in his lengthy paper published almost a century ago, tells of the pride of Corvisart, Dupuytren and Trousseau in announcing the patient's profession at first sight.

The present study is an attempt to assemble examples of stigmas, some characteristic and common, valuable for identification purposes, some uncommon or rare or obsolete, of much less practical value but interesting.

Most of the observations were made on private or hospital patients seeking various forms of medical care. Inevitable omissions and

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