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JAMA Diagnostic Test Interpretation
September 12, 2019

Point-of-Care Hemoglobin A1c

Author Affiliations
  • 1Division of General Internal Medicine and Geriatrics, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, Illinois
  • 2Department of Preventive Medicine, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, Illinois
  • 3Institute for Public Health and Medicine, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, Illinois
  • 4Department of Laboratory Medicine, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland
JAMA. 2019;322(14):1404-1405. doi:10.1001/jama.2019.14063

A 57-year-old white man with obesity and hypertension presents for a primary care visit, during which he expresses concern about having diabetes. He reports no symptoms of hyperglycemia, such as frequent urination, increased thirst, fatigue, or visual changes, and had no known family history of diabetes. A series of blood tests had recently been obtained (Table). His body mass index (BMI) is 33.9 and his blood pressure is 160/90 mm Hg. The patient wants to know if a test could be done in the office to determine if he has diabetes.

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