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August 4, 1945

CARCINOMA OF THE ORAL CAVITY: A TEN YEAR SURVEY IN A GENERAL HOSPITAL

JAMA. 1945;128(14):1012-1016. doi:10.1001/jama.1945.02860310026006
Abstract

Carcinoma of the oral and pharyngeal mucous membranes comprises 3 per cent of all cancer and accounts for approximately 3,700 deaths yearly in the United States registration area. It is usually considered accessible cancer as contrasted to similar disease of the internal organs; yet the five year survival rates for it in this location are no better than for disease in some of the more inaccessible organs, such as the cecum and the large intestine. There are only a few large centers throughout the country limiting their work to the treatment of cancer and therefore it is treated for the most part in general hospitals. The excellent detailed reports from such specialized institutions as the Memorial Hospital of New York City are well known but perhaps do not give as clear a picture of the results obtained in a general hospital as might be desired.

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