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August 11, 1945

THE USE OF FIBRIN FILM AS A DURAL SUBSTITUTE: AND IN THE PREVENTION OF MENINGOCEREBRAL ADHESIONS FURTHER STUDIES AND CLINICAL RESULTS

JAMA. 1945;128(15):1088-1091. doi:10.1001/jama.1945.02860320030008
Abstract

The need for a material which acts as a substitute for excised or injured dura mater and at the same time prevents meningocerebral adhesions has long been one of the most pressing in neurologic surgery. Numerous dural substitutes have been tried with varying degrees of success. On long-range study not one has proved adequate to fill these requirements.1 In spite of this, the results secured when no material is employed have been so unsatisfactory that most neurosurgeons prefer to use one or another of the available dural substitutes, whatever their shortcomings may be.

In the course of a program devoted to the fractionation of human blood plasma,2 large quantities of human fibrinogen and thrombin have become available.3 From these proteins it has been possible to prepare a material, fibrin film,4 which has been subjected to experimental and clinical trial as a dural substitute.5

A variety

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