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August 25, 1945

STUDIES IN RHEUMATIC FEVER: THE PHYSIOLOGIC EFFECT OF SODIUM SALICYLATE ON THE HUMAN BEING, WITH PARTICULAR REFERENCE TO THE PROTHROMBIN LEVEL OF THE BLOOD AND THE EFFECT ON HEPATIC PARENCHYMA

Author Affiliations

UNITED STATES NAVAL RESERVE

From the Rheumatic Fever Unit of the United States Naval Hospital, Corona, Calif.

JAMA. 1945;128(17):1195-1200. doi:10.1001/jama.1945.02860340001001
Abstract

In the course of many years the therapeutic usefulness of salicylates has become well established. With dosages within reasonable limits, the untoward reactions which sometimes have developed always have been of minor importance. Recently, however, several papers and editorials have appeared which suggest that even with relatively small doses of salicylates the tendency to hemorrhage is increased; this tendency is indicated by the fall in the prothrombin content of the blood and, in some instances, by an increase in the blood coagulation time.1

During the treatment of large numbers of young adults with active and inactive rheumatic fever hemorrhagic tendencies have been noted infrequently in this hospital, and even when this tendency has occurred it did not appear to be correlated with the administration of salicylates. This broad clinical impression was so divergent from those results recently reported that a control study was undertaken to determine primarily the effect

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