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Editorial
January 14, 2020

Opportunities and Challenges in Valuing and Evaluating Aging Physicians

Author Affiliations
  • 1Department of Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts
  • 2Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts
  • 3Department of Medicine, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts
JAMA. 2020;323(2):125-126. doi:10.1001/jama.2019.19706

In 2017, more than 15% of practicing physicians were older than 65 years.1,2 Without a national mandatory retirement age, many physicians plan to practice until they are in their 70s or 80s. Cognitive decline often accompanies aging, and the prevalence of dementia increases rapidly after age 70 years.3 Thus, it is not surprising that the issue of screening aging physicians for cognitive deficits has gained attention over the last decade.2

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