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October 6, 1945

BENZ1DINE AS CAUSE OF OCCUPATIONAL DERMATITIS IN A PHYSICIAN

JAMA. 1945;129(6):442-443. doi:10.1001/jama.1945.92860400002008a
Abstract

Eczematous dermatitis is not an uncommon occupational disease among physicians and dentists. Often merely a constant annoyance or handicap, the dermatitis may be so severe, intractable and incapacitating that it forces the physician to change his specialty or even to give up his profession entirely.

Often, particularly in surgeons, the dermatitis is due largely to the primary irritant effects of chemical agents such as soap or alcohol and physical agents such as friction (scrubbing), heat and maceration (under rubber gloves). In other cases the dermatitis is due mainly to allergens to which the physician is exposed in the course of his work. Notorious among these allergens are rubber gloves, local anesthetics and some local antiseptics.

This case of occupational allergic eczematous dermatitis is reported because the causal allergen, although used by many thousand doctors in their everyday work, has to my knowledge never been described as a cause

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