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March 20, 1937

THE INTRAVENOUS ADMINISTRATION OF HYPERTONIC SALT SOLUTION FOR ANURIA: IN PATIENTS WITH ONE KIDNEY

Author Affiliations

BOSTON

From the George F. Baker Clinic, New England Deaconess Hospital.

JAMA. 1937;108(12):947-949. doi:10.1001/jama.1937.02780120017003
Abstract

The development of anuria is always an emergency, but its occurrence in patients who have previously lost a kidney seems hopeless. The causes of anuria are varied, but it is important to remember that, in certain cases of anuria in which great loss of body fluid and diminished concentration of plasma chloride have followed vomiting, excessive sweating or diarrhea without adequate intake of fluid, treatment by the intravenous administration of salt solution has given surprisingly good results. The explanation of this type of anuria is not clear. The presence of fever and infection suggests that the anuria occurred because of abnormal kidney function. However, in the cases of two children previously described,1 except for temporary renal irritation from diabetic acidosis in one little girl, no evidence of renal disturbance occurred. In none of these cases has medical shock been a factor. The relief produced promptly by the use of

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