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November 3, 1945

HERNIAS AND SERIOUS INJURIES IN MARITIME COMMISSION SHIPYARDSWITH REFERENCE TO PREPLACEMENT EXAMINATIONS

JAMA. 1945;129(10):672-676. doi:10.1001/jama.1945.02860440020007
Abstract

Shipyards working under contracts for the United States Maritime Commission employed, during the war emergency period, about one million persons in yards located on the perimeter of the United States. Soon after the true magnitude of the shipbuilding program became apparent the Maritime Commission and the United States Navy, realizing the need to increase production, adopted a set of "Minimum Requirements for Safety and Industrial Health in Contract Shipyards."1 These requirements were designed to conserve manpower and promote the physical welfare, health and safety of employees. One of the basic precepts was the mandatory establishment of preplacement physical examination procedures in each of these contract shipyards (par. H-6.1, ref. 1). Consequently all shipyards of the Gulf and East Coast regions and some of those in the Great Lakes region which had not previously required such examinations developed necessary facilities and plans to include them in their employment procedure. Shipyards

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