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November 10, 1945

PROGNOSIS OF SUBARACHNOID HEMORRHAGE: AND ITS RELATION TO LONG TERM MANAGEMENT

JAMA. 1945;129(11):715-718. doi:10.1001/jama.1945.02860450001001
Abstract

Following the definition of. the syndrome of subarachnoid hemorrhage by Symonds1 in 1923, its recognition has presented little difficulty. Excellent descriptions of the syndrome and summaries of the literature have been presented by Strauss, Globus and Ginsburg,2 Sands3 and Dandy.4

Subarachnoid hemorrhage is responsible for 2 per cent of sudden deaths.5 It comprises 7 per cent of all cerebral vascular disease and approximates in frequency parenchymatous cerebral hemorrhage (8 per cent).6 The most common cause of subarachnoid hemorrhage is rupture of intracranial arterial aneurysms. Among others the studies of Bremer,7 Forbus,8 McDonald and Korb,9 Richardson and Hyland10 and Magee11 have contributed much to our knowledge of the formation, occurrence and natural history of intracranial arterial aneurysms and their role in the production of subarachnoid hemorrhage. Dandy4 has recently reported his pioneer work in the surgical treatment of intracranial

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