[Skip to Content]
Access to paid content on this site is currently suspended due to excessive activity being detected from your IP address 34.237.138.69. Please contact the publisher to request reinstatement.
[Skip to Content Landing]
Views 6,173
Citations 0
Viewpoint
COVID-19: Beyond Tomorrow
June 3, 2020

Outpatient Treatment at Home for Medicare Beneficiaries During and After the COVID-19 Pandemic

Author Affiliations
  • 1Penn Center for Cancer Care Innovation, Abramson Cancer Center, and Department of Medical Ethics and Health Policy, Perlman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia
  • 2Healthcare Transformation Institute and Department of Medical Ethics and Health Policy, Perlman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia
JAMA. 2020;324(1):21-22. doi:10.1001/jama.2020.9017

On April 30, 2020, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) released an unprecedented emergency policy waiver to increase capacity in response to coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19): Hospital outpatient departments can now relocate health care services to off-campus sites or even into Medicare beneficiaries’ homes. For the duration of the public health emergency, these relocated services will be reimbursed at the higher outpatient prospective payment system rates rather than the typical physician fee schedule rates for new off-campus sites, an increase of approximately 40% for similar outpatient services.1 Both the relocation and payment waivers will terminate when the Department of Health and Human Services withdraws the emergency declaration at the end of the COVID-19 pandemic, although how that will be decided is unclear.

Limit 200 characters
Limit 25 characters
Conflicts of Interest Disclosure

Identify all potential conflicts of interest that might be relevant to your comment.

Conflicts of interest comprise financial interests, activities, and relationships within the past 3 years including but not limited to employment, affiliation, grants or funding, consultancies, honoraria or payment, speaker's bureaus, stock ownership or options, expert testimony, royalties, donation of medical equipment, or patents planned, pending, or issued.

Err on the side of full disclosure.

If you have no conflicts of interest, check "No potential conflicts of interest" in the box below. The information will be posted with your response.

Not all submitted comments are published. Please see our commenting policy for details.

Limit 140 characters
Limit 3600 characters or approximately 600 words
    2 Comments for this article
    EXPAND ALL
    Getting a Dr. to Make a House Call
    Galen Warden, None | Lay Person, not a medical professional
    My adult son is severely disabled and bed bound. He can't feed himself or use the toilet. He has a very serious neurological condition, and a specialist for his condition, a neurologist at Mt. Sinai in NYC, is managing his care.

    However, he can't ethically prescribe, so we need a local doctor here in Beaufort, SC, or nearby, to come to the house and examine my son just one time to manage his treatment. No one will work with us, nor prescribe medication, without first seeing him. But no one will make that singular house call
    /> Here's a question for the doctors reading this: In the time of Covid-19 rule changes, like the one in this article, what can I do or say to all of these local doctors who are declining to make one house call for my son?

    Taking him to a doctor's office via ambulance and stretcher is not only very expensive and inconvenient, it's risky for my son. However, this is what I'll be forced to do very soon if I can't talk anyone into making that one house call. (My son is on South Carolina Disability and Medicaid, not Medicare, because he's been sick since he was a teenager and doesn't have a work history).

    Thank you for your suggestions.
    CONFLICT OF INTEREST: None Reported
    READ MORE
    Getting a Dr. to Make a House Call
    Galen Warden, None | Lay Person, not a medical professional
    My adult son is severely disabled and bed bound. He can't feed himself or use the toilet. He has a very serious neurological condition and a specialist for his condition, a neurologist at Mt. Sinai in NYC, is managing his care.

    However, he can't ethically prescribe, so we need a LOCAL DR., here in Beaufort, SC, or nearby, to come to the house and examine my son JUST ONE TIME in order to manage his treatment locally. No one will work with us, nor prescribe medication, without first seeing him. But no one will make that singular house
    call

    Here's a question for the doctors reading this: In the time of Covid-19 rule changes, like the one in this article, what can I possible do or say to all of these local dr.s who are declining to make one house call for my son?

    Taking him to a doctor's office via ambulance and stretcher is not only very expensive and inconvenient, it's risky for my son. However, this is what I'm forced to do very soon if I can't talk anyone into making that one house call. (My son is on South Carolina Disability and Medicaid, not Medicare, because he's been sick since he was a teenager and doesn't have a work history).

    Thank you for your suggestions.
    CONFLICT OF INTEREST: None Reported
    READ MORE
    ×