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April 17, 1937

AMINO ACIDS AS LIMITING FACTORS IN MALIGNANT GROWTHS

JAMA. 1937;108(16):1344-1345. doi:10.1001/jama.1937.02780160036016
Abstract

The importance of certain dietary essentials for normal nutrition and growth is well established. As the phenomenon of growth is characterized by a rapid synthesis of body tissue, the need fordietary protein as raw material for this synthesis is apparent. More specifically, the demand for exogenous nitrogen for the building of cellular protoplasm is a manifestation of the need for the individual amino acids, which comprise dietary protein and which are made available to the organism by the processes of digestion and absorption. The pioneer work of Osborne and Mendel clearly demonstrated that, while the body is capable of synthesizing most of these amino acids, this is not true of a certain number of these compounds which must be supplied in the diet and which therefore were termed by those investigators "essential amino acids." Our present knowledge of the rôle of the amino acids in nutrition and growth indicates that

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