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December 8, 1945

PERIPHERAL NERVE INJURIES IN EUROPEAN THEATER OF OPERATIONS: MANAGEMENT, WITH SPECIAL REFERENCE TO EARLY NERVE SURGERY

JAMA. 1945;129(15):1011-1014. doi:10.1001/jama.1945.02860490023006
Abstract

The improper management of peripheral nerve injuries, as is well known, can leave the patient with a useless, anesthetic limb, amputation of which is frequently the lesser evil. The fact that approximately 15 per cent of all battle injuries of the extremities in the European Theater of Operations were complicated by nerve damage therefore made the planning of an efficient program for their management a matter of extreme importance. Like all programs planned in wartime, the regimen finally devised was based on fundamental surgical principles modified, as circumstances required, to bring them into accord with the exigencies of the military situation.

The neurosurgical principles on which the management of peripheral nerve injuries in the European Theater of Operations was based may be briefly stated as follows: 1. In view of the irreparable degenerative changes which occur in the distal segment and the end plates of a severed nerve with the

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