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December 15, 1945

EARLY FILARIASIS IN YOUNG SOLDIERS: CLINICAL AND PATHOLOGIC ANALYSIS

JAMA. 1945;129(16):1074-1079. doi:10.1001/jama.1945.02860500006002
Abstract

With the onset of war filariasis, known chiefly to tropical medical practitioners, became a disease to be recognized and managed by medical officers, and in the future by civilian physicians. The disease was formerly recognized by its elephantoid character in the late stages. With the onset of war, military and naval personnel residing in filarial endemic areas contracted the disease and developed new and hitherto unrecognized clinical manifestations. Sporadic reports of early filariasis have appeared of recent date in the literature. King and Wartman1 discuss the clinical and pathologic manifestations of early filariasis in a group of soldiers residing in the Samoan Islands. Michael2 describes a similar picture among naval and marine personnel, who have been evacuated to state-side naval hospitals. Zuckerman and Hibbard3 have described changes occurring in the lymphatic tissues of patients infected in the South Pacific Islands. Rifkin and Thompson4 describe their observations

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