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Editorial
October 13, 2020

Intensive Smoking Cessation Counseling for Patients With Cancer

Author Affiliations
  • 1Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of North Carolina School of Medicine, Chapel Hill
  • 2Department of Family Medicine, University of North Carolina School of Medicine, Chapel Hill
  • 3Division of Oncology, Department of Medicine, University of North Carolina School of Medicine, Chapel Hill
JAMA. 2020;324(14):1401-1403. doi:10.1001/jama.2020.13102

Smoking remains the leading cause of preventable death in the United States.1,2 Tobacco use increases the risk of multiple cancers, including lung, oropharyngeal, pancreas, bladder, stomach, and colon.3 Continued tobacco use following a cancer diagnosis increases the risk of cancer recurrence, new primary cancers, and adverse treatment-related outcomes, including postoperative pulmonary complications, poor surgical healing, and decreased response to chemotherapeutic drugs.4

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