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Article
February 13, 1932

FOOD AND HEALTH—A STUDY OF CONSUMERS' HABITS

JAMA. 1932;98(7):556-557. doi:10.1001/jama.1932.02730330038012
Abstract

Knowledge about nutrition seems to be in a state of continual flux. Fifteen years ago Mendel1 of Yale University, addressing the second Pan American Scientific Congress at Washington, remarked that man no longer depends on his instincts alone for guidance in the affairs of life; otherwise progress would indeed be slow. He pointed out that the problem of food supply is not one which can be dismissed by the social philosopher or solved by the calculations of the economist. It is highly complex with its involvement of factors and interests in agriculture, commerce, industry and nutrition. Here, as in other domains, there is opportunity for an interplay of science and the arts, of experience and investigation. To attempt to foretell the future seems more like an act of ill considered rashness than a keen intellectual venture. We are beginning to learn what real food values mean. There is as

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