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June 5, 1937

HYPOGLYCEMIC THERAPY: REPORT OF EIGHT CASES

Author Affiliations

TAMPA, FLA.

JAMA. 1937;108(23):1959-1961. doi:10.1001/jama.1937.02780230019005
Abstract

Publicity in the press and the keen interest of the medical profession regarding reports from European clinics of the remarkable results obtained through the use of hypoglycemic shock therapy in the treatment of dementia praecox caused the Committee on Public Education of the American Psychiatric Association to warn both the public and the profession about this new therapy. As mentioned recently in The Journal,1 the public statement was concurred in by all members of the committee and also by the president of the association, Dr. C. Macfie Campbell. In this warning it was stated that the impression that there is no treatment for dementia praecox except through insulin therapy is entirely erroneous and that the insulin shock treatment is being studied in the New York and Massachusetts state hospital systems, in Bellevue Hospital, New York, and in other scientific centers but is not to be undertaken except by those

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