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June 5, 1937

ENCYSTED TRICHINAETHEIR INCIDENCE IN A PRIVATE PRACTICE AND THE BEARING OF THIS ON THE INTERPRETATION OF DIAGNOSTIC TESTS

JAMA. 1937;108(23):1964-1967. doi:10.1001/jama.1937.02780230024007
Abstract

Ever since those days when the early anatomists dulled their scalpels on the calcified cysts of trichinae in the muscles of cadavers, trichinosis has been a more common disease of man than generally has been recognized. Just how common it is in North America is not known but recent literature indicates that it is of far more frequent occurrence than most physicians have realized. In the United States many physicians apparently have thought that federal meat inspection regulations protected citizens, but there is evidence that critical evaluation of the actual effect of these regulations has been lacking. It is perhaps not sufficiently realized that only a part of the hogs consumed in the United States are killed in supervised abattoirs1 and that the regulations do not provide for microscopic examination of the tissues of hogs.2 Further, it may not be generally known that somewhere from 3 to 6

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