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Article
March 5, 1932

TREATMENT OF ADDISON'S DISEASE WITH AN EXTRACT OF SUPRA-RENAL CORTEX (CORTIN)

Author Affiliations

BUFFALO

From the Laboratory of Physiology, University of Buffalo, and the Buffalo General Hospital.

JAMA. 1932;98(10):788-793. doi:10.1001/jama.1932.02730360010003
Abstract

Various kinds of organotherapy have been used in Addison's disease since the association of the supra-renals with that syndrome was pointed out by Addison in 1855. Kennicutt,1 in 1897, reviewed the literature and reported that twenty-eight of forty-eight cases were improved by such therapy. In view of our present knowledge it is difficult to attribute the improvement in such a large proportion of cases to organotherapy. The remissions that may occur could account for the improvement in at least part of the cases. If improvement is very slow it may be independent of treatment. The best evidence of efficacy of organotherapy is the occurrence of relapse each time treatment is stopped.

Some success has been attributed to the use of whole suprarenal or of cortex by mouth together with epinephrine administered to the point of tolerance by rectum and subcutaneously.2

In October, 1927, Hartman, MacArthur and Hartman3

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