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Article
March 12, 1932

DEXTROCARDIA SECONDARY TO EVENTRATION OF THE DIAPHRAGM: REPORT OF AN ASYMPTOMATIC CASE

Author Affiliations

ATLANTA, GA.

JAMA. 1932;98(11):883-885. doi:10.1001/jama.1932.02730370023009
Abstract

Dextrocardia with general transposition of the viscera is not particularly uncommon and offers no great difficulty in diagnosis. Isolated intrinsic dextrocardia without other grave cardiovascular maldevelopment is one of the rarest anomalies. To find a normal heart on the right side above normal liver dulness therefore suggests that the position of the heart is secondary to a defective diaphragm. Such displacement of the heart has been mentioned in many recent publications on eventration and hernia of the diaphragm. However, this point has not been emphasized in cardiologic literature, probably because, if any symptoms are present, subphrenic ones usually dominate the clinical picture.

In 1927, Christian1 said of eventration of the diaphragm:

The great majority of reported cases has occurred in males. It is almost invariably on the left side.... As the condition is congenital, both thoracic and abdominal viscera accommodate themselves to the defect, and as a result there

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