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Article
March 19, 1932

CALCIFICATION IN TUBERCULOSIS OF THE SUPRARENAL GLANDS: ROENTGENOGRAPHIC STUDY IN ADDISON'S DISEASE

Author Affiliations

Fellow in Medicine, the Mayo Foundation; ROCHESTER, MINN.

From the Division of Medicine and the Section on Roentgenology, the Mayo Clinic.

JAMA. 1932;98(12):954-961. doi:10.1001/jama.1932.02730380022007
Abstract

Calcification has long been accepted as evidence of chronic or of healed tuberculous infection. Although other forms of inflammation may occasionally result in calcification, in cases of tuberculosis in which the healing process lags only a little behind the destructive action of the lesion, calcification is extremely common. This was recognized, particularly in regard to lesions of the lungs and the lymph nodes, long before the advent of roentgen rays. Although calcification is not entirely pathognomonic, it almost always indicates tuberculosis, so that in the minds of physicians calcification and tuberculosis are indissolubly associated, especially during the process of healing. It would seem rational, therefore, to assume that calcification might occur in the suprarenal glands of patients with Addison's disease, as the process is frequently tuberculous.

Our interest in the possibility of revealing calcification in the suprarenal glands was aroused in 1925 by a letter from Sir Byron Bramwell,1

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